culture

Music? Review? You decide, then play.

You know, I never get asked, “Shepherd Siegel, the world knows you as an intergalactically recognized artist…but what are you REALLY like?” Nope, never been asked that. Well, I just live life by three simple rules. Yours may look a little different, but I think you’ll get the idea. In fact, I’d love to hear …

Dead & Company . . . We’re Still Interstellar!

Sometimes there is something special about Grateful Dead music. Of course, they’re special even when the singing is out of tune, when they fall off the horse and you experience them getting back on. Their flaws only add to the fun and joy of being among their millions of fans. So . . . there …

The Wrong Arguments

Part 3: Let It All Hang Out We could be building a society where all people are free to seek balance in their lives, an omnarchy that celebrates and incorporates a holistic vision of humanity that quite simply includes everyone. And the basic, obvious, it’s-about-time-ness of equal pay and equal opportunity are foregone conclusions. Instead we …

The Wrong Arguments

Part 2: Lawyers, Guns and Money We could be getting to the root causes of homelessness by offering a more meaningful public high school education. Such an education, among other things, offers and promotes programs that teach the skills that earn access into all legitimate forms of well-paid employment. Blue collar and all other non-baccalaureate …

The Wrong Arguments

Part 1: Can I get a witness? Recent shifts in American politics have brought some benefits. Average Jane’s, Joe’s, They’s and Those are more politically aware, concerned, maybe even involved and active. Advances in technology may deliver new modes of participatory democracy that have more traction than a mouse-click but less risk than fighting in …

Happy Birthday, Erik Satie!

One of the very greatest exponents of tricksterism in music. Wikipedia sez: Éric Alfred Leslie Satie (French: [eʁik sati];[1] 17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925), who signed his name Erik Satie after 1884, was a French composer and pianist. Satie was an influential artist in the late 19th- and early 20th-century Parisian avant-garde. His work was …

Time Travel, the Pogo Stick of Philosophy [Part 1]

In 1895, H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine captured the popular imagination and set the tone for our infinite fascination with time travel. Its attendant gadgetry kept the nerdier fans busy, while others were distracted by the possible and impossible science of it.   But the idea of time travelers is more significant. The time traveler, like a …

Time Travel, The Pogo Stick of Philosophy [Part 2]

In King Lear, theGodfather of its time, Shakespeare exposes the folly of power through his narrative of it slipping away. Lear’s Fool matches elusive power with a taunting dance of his own. He represents Lear’s conscience, but Lear ignores him. The Fool makes Lear’s madness worse, driving him crazy. He dances on the play’s mushrooming …

Time Travel, The Pogo Stick of Philosophy [Part 3]

Take this example for contrast. A woman testifies: I am glad that I own a gun because when that man tried to break into my house, it was that gun that protected me and my baby. It’s hard to dispute this mother’s position and essential role. She is bound in time to this critical, difficult, …

Lost in the Supermarket (a poem with footnotes)

I’m all lost in the supermarket, I can no longer shop happily, I came in here for that special offer Guaranteed Personality.*         I encountered this army of oversized shopping carts, War tanks Armored fighting vehicles The more that you add to them The more they subtract from your soul.   While …